Meat Free Week

Ok, so this is a little late for a post on #meatfreeweek – but hey, I’ve just been enjoying not one, but two 4-day weekends. And now that’s nicely sinking in… 😉

Two weeks ago was indeed Meat Free Week. I heard about it through BBC Good Food Magazine, and as we are running a pretty low-meat diet anyway, and Dave wanting us to consider going vegetarian, I thought it would be a good idea to give it a go. We normally only have meat or fish two to three times a week, so it really wouldn’t be too much extra effort for us to cut it out completely, and it would give me an excuse to search out even more amazing veggie recipes.

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I’ll be honest – it didn’t pan out so well. We were eating round our parents twice that week, and whilst my parents are coming around to the idea of veggie meals being satisfying and interesting, Dave’s parents are more of a traditional ‘meat & two veg’ kind of family. This wasn’t about preaching or some kind of detox for me – so I wasn’t bothered about missing out on a couple of days. For me it was more about trying to spread awareness of the excitement of veggie food, and getting our friends to understand how much better we feel for having a low meat diet, and how much money we save. My friend certainly got a load of links to my favourite BBC veggie recipes, though he declined to give Meat Free Week a go himself.

Day#1 was a recipe I adapted from my Gino D’Acampo pasta recipe book – I share the Italian chef’s love of artichokes, and his recipe for artichoke & parma ham pasta is divine, zingy flavours with a really comforting, homemade feel to it. I had recently been talking (gushing) with a friend about halloumi, and he said that halloumi is like the bacon of the cheese world, and it seemed to me like that was a pretty spot on comparison! So I thought I would try swapping out the parma ham for some diced halloumi – fried separately and added at the end. Unfortunately, it didn’t quite work 😦 the artichokes completely overpowered the halloumi, and the rubbery texture of the cheese didn’t really work with the soft pasta. But hey, you live and learn right!

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The meal for Day#2 was much more successful – fennel and red pepper chickpea salad! You can’t go wrong with chickpeas, and I am in love with fennel at the moment, it’s just such an unusual flavour that actually works with a lot of things. It was a fairly sweet meal, with the red peppers, fennel and onion, but the earthiness of the chickpeas rounded it of nicely. I was a bit concerned with how filling the salad would be when I plated up, but chickpeas are always surprisingly satisfying – worst comes to worse, add 50g couscous per person to fluff it up a bit.

Day#3 is an old lunchtime favourite – black bean & feta chimichurri. I love the way the feta cheese gets all over the avocado, and the contrast in texture between the slightly firm black beans and the juicy tomatoes. The only thing I should try and remember with this is to cut down on the onion – mixed with the cumin it just gets a little to sharp and vicious for my liking. To ramp this lunchtime salad up to a filling dinner, we simply served up with nachos and used the bowl like a really chunky dip – I couldn’t finish mine, it was so delicious but I was well and truly stuffed!

And finally, Day#4 was a meal I’ve been meaning to try for ages – chickpea and vegetable curry. Again, can’t go wrong with chickpeas, and I love how perfectly they work in a curry, soaking up all the flavours and creating nice texture within the sauce. This recipe was a bit of a learning curve though – whilst preparing the ingredients I found I was a little dubious about the amount of coconut cream I was instructed to use compared to the time needed to cook the broccoli – whilst the tomatoes would create a reasonable amount of liquid, there was barely anything else. I started out as per the instructions, but found I had to quickly improvise with some veg stock and keep adding more hot water. Even after doing that, I didn’t want to include the spinach at the last minute for fear of soaking up the last of fairly dry curry sauce and ending up with curry flavoured veg. The flavours were beautiful, but the recipe just needs a little tweaking to get a proper saucy consistency.

And there you have it! I must say I was a little disappointed with the lack of #meatfreeweek I found on social media – granted I mainly use instagram these days but there still wasn’t much interest for this particular hashtag, not even from the chefs I follow. Whilst I do think we are really getting there with the idea of healthy eating all round instead of these stupid fad diets and god knows what, I think the concept of veggie food being boring is still quite prevalent. I had so many people saying to me “Meat free for a week? God I couldn’t do that!” and whilst I do love my meat, I did find it a shame how few people were interested in giving it a go for just one week, just to broaden their horizons a little and discover some new food. I am a huge fan of veggie and vegan food even, and though I do believe we are meant to eat meat as omnivores, I think it’s an important balance to get as much green goodness into us as possible. The other benefits are that a low meat diet also means you can afford to be choosier with the meat you do buy, meaning better quality (food for us, quality of life for the animals)

And if anyone still says that veggie meals are boring, take a look at this I made the other day…

Yours,

The Vintage Housewife x

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